Container Platform Implementation

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We can design your next cloud-enabled container lifecycle management containers deployment. During deploying projects to the cloud it takes inordinately long to study architectural decision-making tools, parameters, and the required sequence of tasks. Get started by using Red Hat's OpenShift Container Platform reference architecture implementation guide. Reference architectures combine a broad array of expertise to create innovative and high-performance solutions for your business application and simplify its operation.

Best Practices for Creating a Container Platform Strategy

Containers are the next evolution of virtualization, enabling IT organizations to deploy new applications faster and with finer-grained control than ever before. But getting started with containers may not be as straightforward as you think. This ebook walks through six best practices for creating a strategy that includes containers, along with advice on how your organization can benefit from using containers in your environment now.

Are you interested in learning more about the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform reference architecture implementation guide?

The solution is a great way to get started with your container deployment. It’s an easy-to-use, end-to-end blueprint that can help you quickly deploy and manage cloud-native applications on OpenShift. It guides designing, deploying, and managing these types of applications using best practices from Red Hat Consulting Services. This implementation guide includes instructions for building the infrastructure components required to run your application as well as steps for configuring various aspects of the platform including networking, security, logging/monitoring, backup/restore capabilities, and high availability (HA).

You can use this implementation guide to build a secure production-grade environment that meets your business needs without having to spend months planning it yourself.

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform Overview Video

Start exploring the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. It's an open-source container application platform that brings Docker container packaging and Kubernetes openshift container platform cluster management together into one solution that is supported by Red Hat.

What Is The Difference Between A Container And a Virtual Machine?

Containers are becoming increasingly popular, but what are they? And how do they compare to virtual machines?

IT departments around the world are implementing container technology. While it has many advantages, there is one downside: It's not super easy to understand how containers work. This article describes container basics and then gives you some information about the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP). You can get RHOCP free for use in development or production.

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform Architecture Overview

This video provides an overview of the architecture of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, how it works with other Red Hat products, and what's new in the latest version of RHOCP.

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform Architecture Reference Poster

Download this poster to learn about the architecture of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. The poster covers key components used in an on-premise installation of RHOCP, including infrastructure nodes that manage container life cycle events, routing nodes that broker network traffic between containers and external services, log collection services that keep track of application logs during container runtime events, etc -- a distributed configuration store for shared information across all cluster components. This guide is part of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform Architecture Overview poster series.

How Containers Work - A Deep Dive Into Linux Containers

Linux containers are the next big thing when it comes to creating large-scale data center applications. Containers are appealing because they give you an isolated, virtualized environment in which you can run your application, enabling code portability across servers. This article provides a deep dive into Linux container engines and discusses the challenges of moving to containerized infrastructure in production environments.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes & OpenShift

OpenShift is Red Hat's open-source container application platform that builds on Docker container format to provide an easy way for developers to get started deploying applications with Kubernetes - an enterprise-grade container orchestration engine used by Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. In this tutorial, we'll learn about the basic concepts behind container orchestration in the context of OpenShift. We'll also take a hands-on tour of some simple examples to get an appreciation for how it works in practice, and what is involved when supporting production applications.

How To Deploy Kubernetes And Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

This tutorial discusses how you can deploy the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform on public or private clouds using various installation workflows available out of the box. It explains each workflow considering use cases that will help you choose the right one based on your infrastructure and application needs. This tutorial tries to bring together information about deploying containers across different environments so that you can easily identify possible gaps and solve them by choosing an appropriate deployment workflow with minimum effort.

Introduction to Docker and Containers

This tutorial provides a basic introduction to containers and how they work. It explains the key differences between virtual machines and containers and gives you working examples of Docker on CentOS Linux that highlight some of its capabilities. After completing this tutorial, you should better understand container technology and be able to take advantage of it with your applications and/or cloud deployments.

Tell me the OpenShift Container Platform Architecture?

The OpenShift platform is a managed open-source container application platform for deploying and scaling applications in a cloud environment. Kubernetes and Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) are the key underlying technologies upon which the OpenShift Container Platform is built.

Introduction To Containers And Docker

This tutorial provides an introduction to containers, including use cases, benefits, architectures, etc. It also includes links to tutorials that provide step-by-step instructions on how to install openshift container platform Docker technology on your machine or Amazon Web Services (AWS). After completing this tutorial you should have enough knowledge about containers to start building your first images and running them as containers in production.

OpenShift V3 Architecture - Learn How OpenShift V3 Works?

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform is a container application platform that provides comprehensive support for developing and deploying cloud-native applications. In this course, we will explore the architecture of Red Hat OpenShift v3 from installation to the configuration using master components such as etcd, Kubernetes, and atomic CLI. Upon completion, you should be able to understand how OpenShift V3 works from deployment up to production-ready configuration in a production environment with High Availability (HA).

Docker Commands - Practical Usage

This tutorial demonstrates practical usage of Docker commands including docker ps, inspect, run & attach containers. It also explains how to create a new image from a running container and list all images on your Docker host. After completing this tutorial you should have sufficient knowledge of Docker commands to start using it for your development & testing purposes.

OpenShift V3 Deployment Workflows - Learn How To Install OpenShift V3 Cluster?

This OpenShift v3 tutorial covers different methods for installing an OpenShift cluster that includes a 3-node test cluster, an automated installation with Ansible, and a walk-thru of the manual installation process. After successful completion of this course, you will be able to install an OpenShift v3 cluster in any one of these methods. Upon completion, you should have enough understanding about how to use OpenShift v3 along with experience in performing the installation steps yourself.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Exploring Core Concepts and Terminology

This course provides an introduction to Kubernetes concepts and terminology. You will start with key components of Kubernetes, including its main objects (nodes, pods, services, volumes) then explore how these components fit together into a pod design that is used for deploying containerized applications.

Kubernetes Container Networking - Explore Pod-to-Pod Communication And Services For Pods

This tutorial explains the networking model in the OpenShift v3 environment which includes pods accessing internal OpenShift services using NodePorts or ClusterIPs. We'll also look at ways to build high availability for cluster infrastructure deployments by using load balancers to proxy access through service IP addresses. After completing this tutorial you should have the knowledge needed to understand how pods communicate within the OpenShift environment and select an appropriate method for implementing communication between pods in a production environment.

OpenShift V3 Authentication And Authorization - Authenticate Users, Control Access To Resources

In this tutorial, you will learn about authentication and authorization from the perspective of user permissions as well as fully authenticated users to access application resources both external and internal to the OpenShift V3 cluster. After completing this course, you should be able to configure your OpenShift v3 system to provide REST API services securely with Kerberos. You should also have a basic understanding of managing user permissions with Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) which is implemented through a Role Definition File (.json).

GitHub Webhooks In Istio And OpenShift - Setting Up A Custom Action

This tutorial explains how to integrate external applications with Istio Service Mesh. We'll use GitHub webhooks as an example, where we will configure a notification from GitHub to be sent through Istio's sidecar proxy and trigger a custom action implemented in Spring Boot. After completing this tutorial you should have sufficient knowledge of configuration options available for configuring a service mesh that uses SaaS providers or external webhooks.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Multi-Container Deployments For Pods

In this tutorial, we will explore various methods of deploying multiple containers as one pod using the standard kubectl command-line tool as well as some higher-level tools such as OpenShift's oc cluster up. After completing this tutorial you should have the knowledge needed to configure multi-container pods that include master and worker containers as well as tools for replication and scaling.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Deploying A Multi-Tier Application In Istio

This tutorial covers deploying an application consisting of multiple tiers (Java Spring Boot apps) using Istio Service Mesh for load balancing, service discovery & routing, access control, monitoring, etc., across a pool of Kubernetes workers nodes. It also explains how Envoy sidecars are used to provide service mesh functionality for individual pods without requiring modifications to those pods. After completing this course you will be able to deploy your multi-tier application on Kubernetes using Istio.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Multi-Node Deployment For Worker Pods

Kubernetes is a container orchestration tool that can be used to manage both single containers and multi-container applications with the ability to scale both horizontally and vertically. In this course, you will learn how you can deploy pods consisting of multiple containers onto worker nodes in your Kubernetes cluster. After completing the course, you'll know several ways of deploying multiple containers as one pod, scaling them across a pool of worker nodes, modifying resources allocated for each pod, among other things. You'll also have an idea about various methods used by developers when they encounter problems related to running multiple containers as one pod.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Namespace And Resource Quotas

This tutorial explains how to apply quotas across namespaces for cluster resources such as pods, nodes, and others using kubectl command-line tool. After completing this course you should be able to set quotas on namespace level within your OpenShift V3 cluster.

Kubernetes Custom Resources - Implementing A Stateful Application

In this tutorial, we will demonstrate how to create custom objects (CRD) with the standard kubectl command-line tool as well as some higher-level tools such as OpenShift's oc create. The tutorial will also explain how these objects are used in conjunction with custom controllers and how to write your controller. After completing this tutorial you should be able to create custom objects in Kubernetes and know when and where they can be used.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Configuring A TLS Certificate Authority Using OpenSSL And Nginx

This tutorial covers configuring CA (Certificate Authority) with OpenSSL on a Linux server, generating SSL certificates for internal services, creating key pairs & CSRs (certificate signing requests), signing them using the CA certificate created earlier, installing the signed certificates onto servers such as Nginx, etc. When completed, you will know how to set up an internal-use CA and use it in conjunction with TLS/SSL to secure communication between services.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Configuring A TLS Certificate Authority Using OpenSSL, Nginx, And LetsEncrypt

This tutorial is an extension of the previous tutorial. It covers how to use Let's Encrypt certificates with Nginx and replace existing SSL certificates for services on your Kubernetes cluster. After completing this course you should be able to set up an official certificate authority (CA) as well as configure it using TLS/SSL for securing communication between services within your Kubernetes cluster. You'll also know how to replace SSL certificates that are signed by a custom-use CA with free SSL certs provided by the Let's Encrypt service.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Managing Container Resources Limits

This tutorial explains how to set limits for CPU and memory resources on a pod-level using kubectl command-line tool. After completing this course you should be able to configure limits for container resources, take into consideration the current load of a worker node while setting these limits. You'll also know when and why these configurations come in handy.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Configuring A TCP Proxy Service For Enabling Inter-Container Communication In Minikube Environment

In this tutorial, we will explain how to create a simple proxy service that redirects all TCP traffic from one port to another inside the same pod. The proxy itself will run as a separate process so it won't have any effect on the application being proxied. This tutorial will be using Kubernetes 1.10 running inside Minikube 0.30.0 to perform all of the configuration steps mentioned.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Configuring A TCP Proxy Service For Enabling Inter-Container Communication In AWS ECS Environment

This tutorial is an extension of the previous one, moving away from Minikube and instead focusing on Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS). You'll need AWS CLI installed to follow this course as well as access keys configured for accessing your existing ECS cluster. After completing this course you should be able to create a simple proxy service for redirecting traffic between containers within an ECS environment; making it possible for services running across multiple containers to communicate with one another.

Kubernetes Networking - Configuring A Firewall For Container Networks Using iptables

This tutorial explains how to configure a Linux kernel firewall (iptables) for Kubernetes container networks, which are bridge-like objects that provide connectivity between containers on the same host, regardless of their namespace or pod CIDR allocation. After completing this course you should be able to use kubectl command-line tool to create and configure networking for containers, as well as implement proper traffic management by configuring iptables rules for specific pods or a namespace using network policies.

Kubernetes Networking - Taint And Toleration In Kubernetes To Isolate Pod-to-Pod Networking

In this tutorial, we will explain how to isolate the networking of containers on a Kubernetes cluster by marking and tolerating them with custom metadata. After completing this course you should be able to use taints and tolerations to influence pod network connectivity. You'll also know how to implement proper traffic management on the host level using iptables and ipvs for specific pods or a namespace.

Kubernetes Networking - Using OpenVSwitch To Implement Overlay Networks In Kubernetes

This tutorial explains how to set up an overlay-based virtual network with multi-host connectivity for your container workloads using Open vSwitch (OVS). After completing this course you should be able to create, configure and provision an Open vSwitch based overlay network for your Kubernetes cluster using the calico/IPsec-Kube project. You'll also know how to integrate OpenStack Neutron with Kubernetes, as well as manage virtual machines on top of an OVS-based setup.

Kubernetes Networking - Implementing Advanced Network Services Using Contiv Network Plugins And Contiv Container Plugin

This course will cover advanced networking services that were traditionally provided by hardware switches, such as service broadcast suppression or failure domain isolation. After completing this course you should be able to use those features in your container environment running on a Kubernetes cluster.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Configuring Ingress In Kubernetes For Fronting Services With Load Balancers

This tutorial explains how to expose services with Kubernetes using the NodePort and LoadBalancer type, as well as configure and use an external load balancer (such as AWS ELB). After completing this course you should be able to work with service annotations and implement a full-fledged egress solution for containerized workloads. You'll also know how to integrate your setup with common cloud providers such as Amazon EC2, Google Compute Engine, or DigitalOcean.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Implementing Security Context Constraints In Docker Images And Deployments

In this tutorial, we will explain configuring security context constraints in containers using the SELinux and AppArmor profiles. After completing this course you should be able to use the new features introduced in Kubernetes 1.6 allowing you to enforce security context constraints on container runtimes such as Docker, as well as on deployment, which will ensure proper isolation between containers even when they need to interact with each other.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Advanced Scheduling Options In Kubernetes: Partitions And Custom Constraints

This tutorial explains advanced container scheduling options on how and where your applications are placed on a cluster of VMs running Docker or rkt containers using the alternative schedulers by CoreOS (Marathon) or Mesosphere (DC/OS). After completing this course you should be able to use the partition and affinities features for scheduling your applications onto a Kubernetes cluster, as well as implement custom scheduling based on custom metrics.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Implementing Istio Ingress For Consul-based Applications On Kubernetes

In this tutorial, we will explain how to create an Istio ingress controller which you can attach to Consul-based applications deployed on a Kubernetes cluster. You'll also learn how to configure Consul DNS with a wildcard entry pointing to the ingress IP address of your service. By doing this, all requests sent from service consumers automatically route to the appropriate container running in your pod via its assigned service name. After completing this course you should be able to work with the Istio service mesh and implement a scalable ingress controller for microservices-based applications deployed using Kubernetes.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Deploying Prometheus In A Highly Available Configuration On Kubernetes

In this tutorial, we will explain how to deploy Prometheus as a highly available, horizontally scaling monitoring system on top of a Kubernetes cluster. You'll receive an explanation on how to set up automated data persistence and auto-discovery of your services by Consul, as well as integrate authentication and authorization based on Vault policies and RBAC (Role-Based Access Control). By the end of this course, you'll know how to design a solid monitoring system for containerized workloads deployed on a Kubernetes cluster.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Extending Kubernetes Monitoring With Heapster And Influxdb

In this tutorial, we will explain how to use Heapster and InfluxDB to implement support for any existing metric exposed by your operating system inside of the metrics collected by Kubelet running on all hosts in the cluster. You'll learn how to monitor persistent storage, dynamically provisioned block storage, or input/output operations per second using these tools without modifications to the code of your applications. After completing this course you should be able to extend your monitoring stack with custom metrics, which can be used for both historic analysis and alerting.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Managing Container Resources And Resource Pools To Optimize Costs In AWS

In this tutorial, we will explain how to use a custom Ansible playbook and Terraform to automatically deploy your workloads on top of a properly configured Kubernetes cluster. You'll receive an explanation on how to provision nodes using cloud-init which have been pre-configured with CoreOS, Flannel, and other useful add-ons allowing you not only to easily deploy any kind of application but also optimize costs by configuring auto-scaling groups based on CPU or memory usage. After completing this course, you should be able to manage container resources and resource pools in the cloud to reduce your infrastructure costs.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Introduction To Container Security Concepts

In this tutorial, we will explain how to use tools like Sysdig Falco to implement security best practices for your containerized applications deployed on top of a Kubernetes cluster. You'll learn how to easily integrate these tools into your CI/CD pipeline, as well as monitor your container deployments using the same set of tools you're used to using for monitoring virtual machines or physical servers. After completing this course, you should be capable of monitoring and securing both stateless and stateful containers running on top of a Kubernetes cluster.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Securing Stateful Applications Deployed On A Multi-Tenant Cluster

In this tutorial, we will explain how to set up authentication and authorization for multi-tenant environments running stateful applications on top of a Kubernetes cluster. You'll learn about common patterns like using OAuth 2 with OpenID Connect implemented using Vault or adding your custom authentication service. After completing this course, you should be capable of securing multi-tenant clusters running stateful applications deployed using the principles of 12-factor apps.

How is the OpenShift Container Platform secured?

OpenShift Container Platform implements security on two levels:

* Security Features - OpenShift Container Platform implements the best practices of Linux containers, which include SELinux for multi-tenancy and fine-grained access control to critical system resources.

* Authentication - Users are required to authenticate before performing any actions such as viewing or modifying resources.

How does RBAC work in OpenShift?

The Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) system provides a simple, role-based way to manage access across all aspects of the system. RBAC configuration consists of roles and bindings that define what users can view and modify throughout their Kubernetes cluster using permissions policies. The following list describes each aspect: * Roles - Assigns users to roles that grant access to resources.

* Permissions Policies - An ordered list of rules that are associated with custom namespaces; permissions policies can be applied to each namespace for scoped management of access control.

* Bindings - Relationships between users, groups, and roles allowing cluster-wide access.

OpenShift Container Platform implements RBAC by allowing administrators the ability to dynamically configure security in a self-service environment while minimizing the risk of misconfiguration or overprovisioning.

Container Orchestration With Kubernetes - Creating And Managing Custom Resource Definitions Using OpenAPI Specification For REST APIs

In this tutorial, you'll learn how OpenAPI Specification is used by Kubernetes when declaring new custom resources such as storage classes or ingress rules. You'll learn how to use the Kubernetes OpenAPI YAML browser to understand existing resource types and what fields they have, so you know how to properly write your custom resource definitions. After completing this tutorial, you should be able to write your REST API specifications in a way that is compatible with the Kubernetes API server.

Deploying on Red Hat OpenStack Platform

For organizations that are already using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform, integrating containers into your existing cloud infrastructure can be done easily. We will show you how to run the OpenShift Container Platform on Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform leveraging Red Hat Storage technology (GlusterFS) for persistent storage.

What are layers?

Layers are a mechanism for bundling configuration files, images, and templates together as a single package. Use layers to make it easier to manage your customizations and share them across many different configurations or projects.

What is the difference between a template and an image?

Templates create new pod definitions from containers pulled from DockerHub using project registries, while images leverage existing pod definitions on a cluster. Images also support adding read-only volumes that can be shared between containers in a pod definition, whereas templates do not support additional volumes added on top of those defined at the global level.

How does automated image promotion work?

When you configure your CI/CD builder pipeline to automatically deploy updated application code into production, OpenShift Container Platform can automatically update the application pods to use the latest image.

Where is Trusted Registry stored?

The registry images that we deploy into the OpenShift Container Platform are stored in a private container registry and it is integrated with OpenShift and Docker registries. The client certificate generated by the web console only allows access to push and pull trusted images from this private registry. You cannot upload or download anything else from or to this registry, so it's secure.

Do I need certificates for development workloads on an intranet? No, you don't need certificates if your development workloads are running on an internal network. But they will still require authentication if they communicate beyond that network routing (for example, docker run -p 8080:8000 myapp will not be able to request your application running on port 8000 unless you have configured the correct network routing). However, if the app is only accessible from within the same subnet as where you run oc cluster up, then there's no need for certificates.

What happens when a pod fails?

If a pod has recently failed, the build-triggering dependencies that were part of that pod probably still exist in your cluster and can be put back into action. OpenShift Container Platform uses Kubernetes replication controllers to ensure that pod replacements happen quickly enough so as not to cause downtime for any pods being upgraded. If it's too late to use this option (for example, because the pod has already been deleted), you can always update the build trigger to use the latest image.

What is an application gatekeeper?

The application gatekeeper provides internal support for running services, including registry authentication and configuration for HTTP routing. Custom routes are configured using annotations or flags that match hostnames to paths within your applications. You can then access services running on OpenShift Container Platform by directly typing in the hostname at designated entry points, instead of having to first go through a gateway service like Apache or Nginx. By following this approach, you will be able to create a more efficient microservices architecture because your applications don't have to make unnecessary calls across the network stack (which increases the time and reduces performance).

Why would I want to use a web console instead of CLI?

The OpenShift Container Platform web console is a graphical user interface that allows you to more easily work with the different aspects of your projects. You can create new resources, monitor resource usage, view analytics, and manage access control. The built-in Kubernetes command line is perfectly capable of performing these tasks as well, but many users prefer a UI-based workflow.

Are there any tools available for monitoring container resource usage? All pod containers provide metrics that can be retrieved using an HTTP GET request or through direct integration with Prometheus via scrape targets. A running pod also provides metrics in JSON format by sending them to /metrics endpoint in the form of text/plain POST requests when you use journald.

What are the different ways of creating a cluster?

There are several ways to create a cluster: Use the web console. Go through an automated installation script. Manually deploy and configure each node with Ansible and/or Puppet configuration management systems.

Do I need to manually edit files when using the OpenShift Container Platform?

No, you don't have to do that. The web console allows you to define applications, user permissions, quotas for users and projects, builds, and additional custom resource definitions such as Services. It can all be done from within your browser without having to go into any configuration files.

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