File Encryption

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In this case, I'll use align one size on my desktop computer. Only those with correct credentials may read these documents. The following section describes the methods for encrypting personal information.

Sharing files securely without worrying about passwords

Public-key cryptography is a method of encrypting information that uses two different keys, one public and one private. This means that anyone can send you encrypted messages or files, but only someone with the correct key can decrypt them. It's like having a mailbox where everyone has your address but only you have the key to open it. If someone wants to send you an encrypted message, they drop it in your mailbox and then leave before they get caught! The best part is that this process doesn't require any special software because we use email as our medium for communication which makes sharing secure data much more accessible than ever before!

You don't need complicated software or extra hardware because Geolance works directly through email, so all you have to do is click on an attachment sent from another user, and everything will be automatically decrypted for you! With Geolance, there are no limits on file size or type, so whether it's images, videos, documents, or anything else, we've got your back when it comes to security! We're also completely free and always will be - sign up now for unlimited secure messaging today!

Operation

1. Open Windows Explorer and select the file or folder you want to encrypt. Right-click on it and select "Properties".

2. Go to the "General" tab and click on the button callings."

3. In the Attributes window, check off both boxes that appear under Compress contents to save disk space and Encrypt contents to secure data as shown in the screenshot below:

4. Click OK twice and then close all windows as requested by pressing Yes when prompted. The selected files will be encrypted with a 128 bit AES algorithm during the next shutdown/restart of your computer encrypting file system. To decrypt them, repeat these steps but uncheck both boxes before clicking the OK button for 3 above.

5a. If you want to encrypt an entire folder, then all files and subfolders that reside within will automatically be encrypted as well.

5b. There is a program called "FileEncryptor" available for download from CNET where you may select the target folders/files in addition to verifying or changing the encryption settings.

6. The selection below describes how to use TrueCrypt, freely available on the Internet, to create virtual disks on Windows XP, Vista, and newer versions of Windows OS. Users running older versions of Microsoft's operating system should see the references at the end of this article instead because it does not support these new features until they upgrade their respective OSes. First, create a 10Mb disk image with the extension .tc and encrypt it with a 256 bit AES algorithm. Then, mount this disk through TrueCrypt as a virtual drive letter that you may use to store your secret information or even install applications on. Windows 10 users can also see how to create encrypted folders instead of disks.

7a. Obtain the most recent version of TrueCrypt from http://www.truecrypt.org/downloads since there are many fake copies available for download elsewhere on the Internet where malware is sometimes hidden inside them waiting to infect your computer system without your knowledge. 7b. The latest version of the program installs a new driver called 'tcwbfadv,' which must be running to ensure that no other application such as anti-viruses and firewalls prevents TrueCrypt from working as expected. To ensure it is running, open the task manager ( CTRL+ALT+Delete ) and look for an 'Unknown' process called tcwbfadv. If it is not present, start a new Windows Explorer session by clicking on Start > Run or using the shortcut decryption key combination of WinKey + R and run the command "services. MSC". Please scroll down to find this service, right-click on it and select Properties. Then set its Startup type to Automatic instead of Manual by double-clicking on it or choosing automatic startup through the radio button at the bottom of this window. 8a. To create a virtual encrypted disk, you should first click on Create Volume, select the Standard TrueCrypt Volume, browse to your newly created volume image file (e.g., E:\Downloads\ghost-win7-ultimate.tc) and click Next> to continue. 8b. Put in a new password consisting of at least one capital letter (A through Z), one lower case letter (a through z), numbers 0 through 9, special characters ([email protected]#%^&*()_+-" =~`[]{}#@$?) and no less than 16 characters or else it will not work correctly for you in some cases when mounting the virtual disk later on using TrueCrypt as an example. 8c. Followed by creating your encrypted drive, click Finish to close this wizard window without selecting any hidden options or configuration items. 8d. Now click on the newly created virtual drive in the main window to mount it and assign a drive letter (e.g., P:) using either the drop-down menu, double click inside the field, type the desired value manually, or by clicking on one of these buttons at the top of this window. 8e. To make sure that your encrypted disk is appropriately mounted, open 'My Computer' (WinKey + E ), select an unused drive letter not listed there yet (e.g., K:), right-click on it, and choose "Assign Drive Letter." When asked for a new volume label type in 'secret stuff' without quotes instead because it will be stored as plain text inside the encrypted volume. 9a. To encrypt a partition or whole physical hard drive, you should first click on Select Device. Then choose the desired disk by its assigned letter (should be listed in parentheses) or else it may not work properly and choose one of these options:

- Standard TrueCrypt volume, which is merely an encrypted container file;

- A partition or drive which will be formatted;

- Encrypt entire device (e.g., C: - > P: ) 9b. Click Next> to continue and make sure that your selected device is correct. If it does not look similar to what you see below, stop, restart this tutorial from scratch and pay closer attention to step #9a. You should not encrypt a disk containing encrypted data because the process will manage files on this drive by replacing them with an encrypted container file. 9c. Assign a password consisting of at least one capital letter (A through Z), one lower case letter (a through z), numbers 0 through 9, special characters ([email protected]#%^&*()_+-" =~`[]{}#@$?) and no less than 16 characters or else it will not work properly for you in some cases when mounting the virtual disk later on using TrueCrypt as an example. Note: The master encryption key used to protect your files is the same across all TrueCrypt volumes created under Windows and Apple Macintosh, Linux, and UEFI Secure Boot systems. This means that you will have to enter the same password again when creating, mounting, or opening your encrypted partitions with TrueCrypt, no matter which operating system you are currently using, until somebody cracks this algorithm someday in the future. 9d. Followed by choosing a hash algorithm used in your new volume - SHA-512 is faster but weaker in security, so if in doubt, go for Whirlpool instead in most cases - click Next> to continue and wait patiently while it prepares an empty virtual disk file. Make sure that the location it points to does not contain any valuable data because all files stored there will be replaced with random numbers and letters only after clicking the Format button at this stage! 9e. To make sure that your encrypted disk is mounted properly, open 'My Computer' (WinKey + E ), select an unused drive letter not listed there yet (e.g., Q:), right-click on it, and choose "Assign Drive Letter." When asked for a new volume label, type in 'secret stuff' without quotes instead because it will be stored as plain text inside the encrypted volume. Note: TrueCrypt will only display the real name of your volume when you enter the correct password at least once before closing this program, so do that now if you want to see these files later on too with either Windows Explorer or Apple Macintosh. 10a. To create an encrypted disk image using Disk Image Assistant, click on Encryption > Create Image from Device and follow this wizard until step #10b. 10b. To ensure that your new disk image is properly encrypted, click on 'Convert image file to volume format' and go with the default settings (Mac OS X Extended (Journaled) for macOS) unless you know what you are doing. Else it may not work properly. Note: The key used to protect your files is the same across all TrueCrypt volumes created under Windows and Apple Macintosh, Linux, and UEFI Secure Boot systems. This means that you will have to enter the same password again when opening this virtual disk using DiskImageMounter no matter which operating system you are currently using until somebody cracks this algorithm someday in the future. 11a. To create an encrypted disk image using VirtualBox, click on File > New..., enter a new unique name for your virtual machine under 'Name,' select an OS type and version in the drop-down menu next to it (e.g., Windows 7), click on Next> twice, choose 2048 MB (or whatever is displayed) under 'RAM' (>= 2048 MB), checkmark the checkbox named "Enable EFI," go with VHD under 'Hard drive' unless you know what you are doing, enter 'secret stuff' without quotes as an easy to remember disk image name under 'Save As,' leave everything unchanged at step #11b, click on Create when asked for confirmation, wait till it creates this new virtual disk file in your current location, goes to step #11c, and start using it right away! 11b. To ensure that your new encrypted disk image is decrypted correctly, click on Settings > System > Motherboard, select an unused PCI device (e.g., Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Chipset Family USB xHCI Host Controller) under 'Serial ATA controller,' enter the correct security key used to protect your files at least once before closing this program (see step #8 above for suggested values), save these changes, and then reboot to make sure everything works properly afterward. 11c. To mount your newly created virtual disk image file as a real virtual disk, double-click on it in Finder one more time after starting VirtualBox beforehand. If you are not allowed to do that because the image is not signed properly, disable 'Always ask before opening this file in Finder by selecting it and pressing Command-I on your keyboard first. To increase security even further look for the 'Image Locked' checkbox located under 'General' instead, checkmark it to prevent accidental changes, close VirtualBox again, delete everything inside the encrypted disk image (be careful with this one), restart VirtualBox afterward, click on File > Add... in its menu bar, use the same virtual disk file location and name (e.g., secret stuff) like before but without quotes this time to make sure it's mounted properly afterward followed by clicking on Start to fire up your new virtual machine running Windows 7 without any annoying bloatware and completely encrypted! 12a. To create an encrypted disk image using MiniTool Partition Wizard, click on 'Partition Manager' in its main menu, select a new primary partition from the drop-down menu next to 'Create As:,' enter a new unique name for your virtual machine under 'File Name:,' select Linux MIPS from the drop-down menu next to 'File System:,' make sure that both checkboxes near the top of this window are unchecked unless you know what you are doing or else it may not work properly, go with whatever size is displayed below 'Size:' (e.g., 5 GB), type in a new partition name under 'Label:,' go back to step #12b, and start using it right away! 12b. To ensure that your new encrypted disk image is decrypted correctly, click on 'File'> 'Save As...', select a different location from the drop-down menu next to 'Save as type:,' enter a unique name for this virtual machine under 'Name:,' press Command-A to highlight everything, press Shift-Command-C to copy all content, switch back to Partition Wizard by clicking on its application icon in the Dock again, go back to step #12c, and start using it right away! 12c. To mount your newly created virtual disk image file as a real virtual disk, double-click on it in MiniTool's main menu until asked for a password. If you are not allowed to do that because the image is not signed properly, un checkmark 'Read-only' in MiniTool's main menu before clicking on 'Properties > Permissions' instead, select your user account from the list underneath 'Owner,' and then add yourself to the group next to 'Group:.' When asked for a password just enter the same one twice (see step #10 above for suggested values). Afterwards, close this program and restart it by simply pressing [Ctrl] + [Alt] + [Delete]. To increase security even further, look for the 'Read-Only: Yes/No' checkbox in MiniTool's main menu next time around and make sure it gets unchecked when creating an encrypted disk image again.

13a. To create a new virtual machine in VirtualBox, start by clicking on 'New' in the top menu bar, enter any name you want under 'Name:,' select Linux for both 'Type:' and Debian (64-bit) for both 'Version:,' go to step #13b below when done, and don't forget to press [Ctrl] + [Alt] + [Delete] afterward! 13b. To ensure that your new virtual machine is not encrypted by default, open up the file location of this virtual machine, click on its '.vbox' file with the right mouse button while holding down [Shift], go to Open With > TextEdit in the pop-up menu, hit Command-F to get to its 'General' settings, un checkmark the 'Encrypted HDD' checkbox next to 'Hard Disk,' close this app again by pressing [Command] + [Q], go back to step #13c below when done, and restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock. 13c. To create an encrypted virtual disk for your new virtual machine, click on File > Create New Virtual Disk. VirtualBox's main menu bar, enter any name you want under 'Name:,' select VDI (Virtual Disk Image) under 'Storage Type:,' leave Dynamically allocated checked underneath 'Allocation Model:,' make sure that 8 GB is selected as maximum size unless you know what you are doing or else it may not work properly, go to step #13d below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward. 13d. To ensure that your new encrypted virtual disk is decrypted when you start up your virtual machine, click with the right mouse button on your new virtual machine underneath 'Storage,' select 'Controller: SATA' from the drop-down menu underneath 'Hard Disk 0:', click on the big CD icon nearby with the right mouse button while holding down [Shift], select a different location from the pop-up menu, hit Command-A to highlight everything, press Shift-Command-C to copy all content, switch back to VirtualBox main menu bar again, select your new virtual machine from the list underneath 'Machines:,' click on 'Start' in the top menu bar, and hit [F11] a couple of times right after your virtual machine has been started to enter its BIOS settings. 14a. To boot from an ISO image inside VirtualBox, click on 'Storage' instead in VirtualBox's main menu bar, select 'Empty' underneath 'Controller: IDE ATA/ATAPI,' go to step #14b below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward! 14b. To set up Windows XP as a guest OS, choose 'CD/DVD-ROM 0: Use one of the following media', go to step #14c below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward!

14d. To set up Windows Vista as a guest OS, choose 'Host Drive 2', go to step #14e below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward! 14e. To run an ISO image of Windows 7 from within VirtualBox, choose 'CD/DVD-ROM 1: IDE Secondary Master' instead of under 'Controller: SATA Controller', go to step #14f below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward! 14f. For your virtual machine(s) to boot from an ISO image, open up a Terminal, type 'nano /Applications/VirtualBox.app/Contents/MacOS/boot2docker', press [Enter] once it has loaded, go to step #14g below when done, and restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock. 14g. For your virtual machine(s) to load from another bootloader, first, open up a Terminal (type 'Terminal' into Spotlight), type 'Sudo nano /boot2docker', hit [Enter], insert your password (typewriter sound and cursor blinking should confirm that you typed something correctly), press [Ctrl]+X, select Y at the prompt, and then press [Enter].

15a. To prevent problems with VirtualBox and the new MBR (Master Boot Record) that was just made for your virtual machine, open up a Terminal (type 'Terminal' into Spotlight), type 'Sudo Fdisk -f /dev/rdisk4', hit [Enter], close all remaining Terminal windows by typing 'exit' and hitting [Enter]' twice more, restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock, and choose your newly created virtual machine from the list underneath 'Machines:.' 15b. To load an ISO image of Windows XP within VirtualBox, click on the little CD and DVD icon next to 'Floppy 1: Select...' underneath 'Storage: IDE Secondary Master: Controller: SATA Controller: Hard Disk 1: Floppy', go to step #15c below when done, and restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock. 15c. To boot from an ISO image inside VirtualBox, click on 'Storage' instead in VirtualBox's main menu bar, select 'Empty' underneath 'Controller: IDE ATA/ATAPI,' go to step #15d below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward! 15d. To set up Windows XP as a guest OS, choose 'CD/DVD-ROM 0: Use one of the following media', go to step #15e below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward! 15e. To set up Windows Vista as a guest OS, choose 'Host Drive 2', go to step #15f below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward! 15f. To run an ISO image of Windows 7 from within VirtualBox, choose 'CD/DVD-ROM 1: IDE Secondary Master' instead of under 'Controller: SATA Controller', go to step #15g below when done, and don't forget to restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock afterward! 15g. For your virtual machine(s) to boot from an ISO image, open up a Terminal, type 'nano /Applications/VirtualBox.app/Contents/MacOS/boot2docker', press [Enter] once it has loaded, go to step #15h below when done, and restart VirtualBox by clicking on its application icon in the Dock. 15h. For your virtual machine(s) to load from another bootloader, first, open up a Terminal (type 'Terminal' into Spotlight), type 'Sudo nano /boot2docker', hit [Enter], insert your password (typewriter sound and cursor blinking should confirm that you typed something correctly), press [Ctrl]+X, select Y at the prompt, and then press [Enter].

Encrypting files and folders in Windows

Yes, it is possible to encrypt files and folders in Windows 7. Follow the steps below to encrypt a file or folder: 1) Open My Computer, right-click on the file or folder you want to encrypt, and click Properties. 2) Click Advanced button under Attributes section 3) Select Encrypt contents to secure data 4) Click OK 5) In Encryption Method dialog box select 128-bit AES as encryption method from the drop-down list 6) Enter the password for encryption and then re-enter that password from confirmation field NOTE: Your network administrator may have fixed this for you already, if not follow these steps:

1. Right-click the Start button and choose Command Prompt (Admin).

2. At the command prompt, type gpedit.MSC, press Enter key.

3. The Group Policy Editor should open now. Navigate to Computer Configuration \ Administrative Templates \ Windows Components \ BitLocker Drive Encryption \ Operating System Drives.

4. You will see two settings here "Require additional authentication at startup" and "Allow BitLocker without a compatible TPM". Double-click on these setting panels twice, select Enabled in the 'Startup mode' drop-down list for Require additional authentication at the startup setting panel, click the OK button, and apply changes back by choosing the Not Configured option Allow BitLocker without a compatible TPM setting panel.

The Best

Encryption of existing files and folders in Windows 7 is the best. Encryption of a running Linux system from inside VirtualBox using its application icon in the Dock is the second best. Finally, encryption of Linux system from inside VirtualBox using boot2docker would be third best.

Secure those originals first

The best way to protect your originals would be first encrypting them using Windows 7 built-in encryption method before transferring those encrypted originals onto a USB flash drive or network storage device. You can then decrypt those original files and replace them with the decrypted versions you have brought back from a USB flash drive or network storage device. Using virtual machines does not encrypt those originals. It only helps you create copies of those originals on a different OS for later use. That's what virtual machines are for - they allow you to experiment on different OS as if they were running on your system as native OS without affecting your existing data. You know what? The whole idea behind this post is experimental because I don't trust any of these methods and their results 100% either. I believe there must be a better way to protect those originals first!

The best encryption software for Windows

Whole Disk Encryption (WDE) using BitLocker Drive Encryption (BDE) built-in to Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate or Enterprise, or available as an upgrade for previous versions of Windows like Vista Business or XP Professional is the best file encryption software commonly used by home users today. It's very easy to use and works flawlessly even with slow computer systems. Unfortunately, I'm not aware of any equally secure encryption software that comes free of charge and includes pre-configured settings ready to use out-of-the-box as BDE does. Please note: WDE/BDE is the only disk encryption software that I'm aware of to work with any USB flash drive. So if you have a choice, WDE/BDE should be your first consideration!

Mobile encryption

If you have a Mac or Linux system at home, then encrypting sensitive files stored on those systems using an application from each one's own App Store would be the next best thing. In case you have a Windows 7 computer at home and would prefer not to use BDE because you're afraid it might slow down file transfers through your network or affect your browsing speed, encrypting files stored on Windows 7 using VeraCrypt (a free open source software drop-in replacement for TrueCrypt) is another option available to choose from.

Cloud encrypted file storage service

Good encryption software makes it possible for you to store your originals on a popular cloud service but preventing those files from being viewed by others with malicious intent is just as important which means you still have to encrypt them again before storing them on the cloud! So what's the point of uploading those encrypted original files to the cloud instead of leaving them behind on your computer system at home or work? In my opinion, there isn't one! So how do companies like Microsoft and Google make money out of the free services they provide without charging any customs fees? Answer: They make money by selling our personal information to advertisers. What's a billion-dollar business today may not necessarily be a billion-dollar business tomorrow! Imagine a hacker successfully breaking into Amazon's Amazon Web Services (AWS) servers and making off with hundreds of thousands of users' details. That is enough information for a fraudulent individual to assume that user's identity and open credit cards in their name! I'm not saying it has ever happened, but it only takes one successful data theft incident like this before we start seeing changes in how companies like Amazon and Google make money.

Conclusion: Protecting originals first before any attempt at securing copies is the best practice you can adopt to protect your data from malicious individuals seeking unauthorized access. You can't do much about an encrypted file stored on a cloud storage service, however, as long as those files remain unreadable by anyone other than yourself! Therefore, if possible, don't upload originals to the cloud instead look for a way to store them locally on your computer system and encrypt them before uploading.

Basic ideas about encryption

Things you need to encrypt a file

A cipher and a key. A cipher is a unique algorithm used to scramble the original file into an encrypted format while a key is nothing but a combination of characters used by that particular cipher. To decrypt that same encrypted file back into its original form, you will have to know what cipher was initially used in the encryption process and possess the corresponding key that goes with it! What happens if I lose my key or forget the password?

In this case, all hope is lost! That's because you won't be able to decrypt any files stored on your computer system once they've been securely deleted from it. Unfortunately, there are no software solutions today capable of recovering deleted files after they've been securely overwritten.

In case you forgot your password.

All hope is not lost but you'll need to reset it or reinstall the operating system (OS) installed on your computer by following instructions that come with either of those actions! If, for whateverSupposeeason, however, you can't perform either of those actions immediately because your computer crashes and restarts itself every time you try performing them, then all hope. In that case, the deed is lost unless an expert analyst can retrieve something called metadata (data about data) from the hard drive's file system using special forensic software! Unfortunately, this process is very time-consuming depending on the size of the encrypted volume being analyzed as well as other factors that affect how much information might be recoverable afterward.

In case you've lost the key to an encrypted file

All hope is lost unless you can find it in some backup location like online cloud storage services, email accounts, or external hard drives! The only way to get your hands on that missing key would be for you to contact whoever created that encrypted volume (volume = folder) and ask them for the password used to create it (password = key)! Depending on how secure you want to keep that data, chances are they won't agree to send it over the Internet without any guarantee of its integrity after sending! If the data inside that encrypted volume is worth risking your money over, then signing a contract with them should suffice. No matter what happens, however, there is no guarantee they'll be able to recover that data after sending the key over the Internet - this is just basic information about encryption without going into too much detail!

The most common encryption algorithms are used today.

Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)  is an encrypted file format designed for privacy and authentication. The GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG or GPG)  uses a variation of PGP. AES-128  and AES-256 are solid encryption algorithms recommended by US Government agencies like NSA. They both use 128-bit and 256-bit encryption keys to encrypt files respectively. Triple DES, also known as 3DES or TDES, is another strong algorithm using a 168-bit key. Blowfish, a symmetric block cipher, uses various file encryption key lengths for encryption: 32-448 bits or even more if needed! It's recommended that you use at least a 128-bit key length to ensure it won't be broken by anyone anytime soon.

The best way to encrypt files

While some file systems like NTFS support native encryption (built into the file system itself), others like ext4 do not. Microsoft Windows 7 supports BitLocker Drive Encryption, while Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) includes FileVault 2 built into their operating systems, which can be used to encrypt entire disk volumes (volumes = disks). If you decide against using either of those built-in encryption systems, I'd recommend using one of the following cross-platform utilities:

* DiskCryptor  (free) – supports a massive list of file systems including NTFS and HFS+.

* TrueCrypt  (free but no longer updated) – an excellent solution for creating a virtual encrypted disk within a file that can be mounted as a volume.

It's not feasible to encrypt everything.

In any case, you should at least use whole-disk encryption whenever possible because it prevents anyone from being able to boot into your computer system from an external device like a USB flash drive unless they have the key used to unlock it! In this case, however, even though someone might be able to boot up your system with a live CD, they won't be able to access encrypted volumes if the whole-disk encryption key is known! If you're not using whole-disk encryption and want to use FileVault 2, for example, on Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion), that's fine as long as you don't forget or lose your password!

File encryption VS whole-disk encryption

There's no hard general rule of thumb about when someone should encrypt some files but not others except for what I said earlier about encrypting everything whenever possible so this is something you'll have to decide upon yourself depending on how vital some data is! You may find it helpful to keep decoy files around in case someone gets your encrypted files by mistake.

A proven way to create a backdoor on a file

If you're not using whole-disk encryption then this is pretty straightforward: any bootable live CD or live USB flash drive can be used to access the entire system as if it's running from that device! If you're using full-disk encryption, however, there are known ways to do this but they require modifying the partition table (which holds information about partitions) and/or volume headers (which hold information about free space, etc.) stored on the disk itself before even encrypting the data stored on it! This process makes it easier for someone with physical access to your computer hardware to recover your password/key used for encryption by modifying or adding a particular boot loader entry. To prevent this from happening, Mac OS X has a hidden option to encrypt all partitions with a separate password that can be entered during startup, preventing someone from modifying the partition table before booting into the operating system. The downside of this method is that you can't use different passwords for disk encryption and FileVault 2 (which uses your login password) together!

Do not confuse Password Reset Disk after encryption with whole-disk/volume encryption!

A Password Reset Disk should only be used when you've forgotten your login password while whole-disk or volume encryption protects everything inside it without depending on any other outside factors besides the password itself! Some people might create an encrypted file(s) inside their home directory before encrypting the whole system to create a Password Reset Disk which would be helpful if they ever forget or lose their login password without having the ability to use FileVault 2!

Using AES encryption algorithm for files

If you're using Linux, BSD, etc., then just about everything is already done for you. Still, I'm only going to mention how this can be accomplished on *nix operating systems that use OpenSSL's libcrypto library. First, know that DAES encryption has two discrete parts initialization vector (IV). The IV always starts as being random da it is followed by a fixed-size portion which is equal. These 128-bits are encrypted with the key, which prevents your data from being decrypted even if someone gets hold of your password or private key. The IV is also very important for when you want to do block encryption rather than stream (or byte) encryption which encrypts one file, etc., at a time without having to deal with the whole chain in the case of full-disk encryption in addition to other benefits like skipping unused sectors!

CBC VS CTR modes

CBC stands for cipher block chaining while CTR stands for a counter mode which means that both use different methods to help protect files, etc. If someone who has physical access to storage media such as USB flash can see how something was encrypted before and figure out what the password was by simply duplicating the same steps we're in big trouble! This is where CBC and CTR can help us. However, they both require a unique IV for each file you encrypt, which generates TR mode repeatedly, doing whatever your "+" symbol would do. In contrast, CBC mode repeatedly does whatever your "|" symbol would do after decrypting the previous chunk of data.

You could memorize all these rules and know exactly when to use each type of encryption but memorizing terms like unencrypted vs plaintext, etc., isn't always possible. Hence, it's best to consult OpenSSL documentation or search online for more information if needed. Some utilities can wrap this up into a GUI interface for you to select all the options, etc., without having to learn the many rules like CBC vs CTR modes which can be used in conjunction with the AES encryption algorithm for files.

I use dd if=/dev/urandom of=./randomfile bs=1 count=1024 whenever I need a random file, so it's always best to use /dev/random or another method. If it's available on your *nix operating system! A simple cat command could give away critical bits of information before the process, although this isn't much of an issue when using modern processors. They also have built-in hardware RNG (random number generator) capabilities, which means that we'll no longer need these methods one day because everything will be done on a hardware level...

Conclusion: Use a Password Reset Disk first and foremost!

Whole-disk/volume encryption is what you should use if you ever have to leave your system unattended for long periods or want the extra security that doesn't rely on any other factors, unlike a password reset disk. The more random data used as crucial input = the better as well as the longer the password = the better as well. While we may never actually encrypt our whole operating system, we could always be prepared for such an event by having encrypted storage space, which can double as a Password Reset Disk before we ever need it! Only people who work in IT, etc. will know how valuable storage media (hard drives) and electricity are!

You should at least have a Password Reset Disk if not full-disk encryption because you never know when someone could steal your laptop or get hold of information they shouldn't be allowed to see. Just imagine all the damage that could be done... This is why it's essential to use OpenSSL for file encryption in addition to proper key management which I haven't covered here even though there are many ways different people handle their keys. You can also derive key material from passwords using PBKDF2, bcrypt, script, etc. so consider this option as well!

Public Key Cryptography and Sharing Passwords

If you don't want to encrypt files with a password but instead use public-key cryptography, I'm not going to get into all the details because this article would turn into a book, etc.! If someone knows your public key, they can encrypt any file for you and send it to your email address without dealing with handling sensitive information like passwords which is why sharing passwords then becomes quite complicated and not worth considering in today's world of technology. Shared secrets from old times are considered obsolete by our standards today due to how easy it is for bad people out there who wish us harm

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