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Easy navigation will help you improve your website's functionality. If a visitor can easily locate what is needed they should stay on this web page instead of leaving or going to another website. A successful navigational design will boost website views, user experience, and even revenue and profits. The increasing use of mobile devices on the web and websites has boosted responsive website design. When designing responsive Web applications it is difficult to design and build a navigation menu that will easily navigate across different devices.

Showcase of responsive website menu design

Today, websites are used on a variety of devices. Mobile device usage has risen to record heights with an expected 1.75 billion smartphone users worldwide by 2019. Businesses are finding it necessary to optimize their Web presence for all mobile users because of the benefits that come with responsive website menus design.

Do you want to improve your website's functionality?

If a visitor can easily locate what is needed they should stay on this web page instead of leaving or going to another website. A successful navigational design will boost website views, user experience, and even revenue and profits. The increasing use of mobile devices on the web and websites has boosted responsive website design. When designing responsive Web applications it is difficult to design and build a navigation menu that will easily navigate across different devices. Geolance provides easy-to-use tools for creating an effective navigation system that works well with all browsers, platforms, screen sizes, resolutions, etc., so you don’t have to worry about how your site looks across various screens!

With our easy-to-use tools, you can create an effective navigation system that works well with all browsers, platforms, screen sizes, resolutions, etc., so you don’t have to worry about how your site looks across various screens!

Website navigation can boost visitor retention and user experience

The best way to build your business is through high-quality design standards, attractive imagery, and great content. Your web pages should always be designed keeping in mind the end goal of how you want your visitors to interact with you online which will ultimately determine if they become paying clients or not. You cannot rely on one source alone when it comes primarily to designing your website menu because there are different types of users and each one has unique requirements which you must address adequately.

Responsive website design with navigational menus

As a business owner, you need to ensure that your website menu is easy to use and navigate across different devices. A solid responsive Web design will help you grow online and attract more customers for your products and services listed on the main site. To make sure that navigation is easy across all devices, we have compiled here 40 websites that show amazing examples of how such buttons can be crafted. The top list comprises not only well-crafted navigation bars but also illustrations, simple icons as well as tight user interaction. All these factors contribute towards the overall growth of your brand's reputation online which leads to an increase in sales and revenue.

The best responsive website navigation menus

As a business owner, you need to ensure that your website menu is easy to use and navigate across different devices. A solid responsive Web design will help you grow online and attract more customers for your products and services listed on the main site. To make sure that navigation is easy across all devices, we have compiled here 40 websites that show amazing examples of how such buttons can be crafted. The top list comprises not only well-crafted navigation bars but also illustrations, simple icons as well as tight user interaction. All these factors contribute towards the overall growth of your brand's reputation online which leads to an increase in sales and revenue.

Useful tips on building professional-looking responsive Website Menu Design Effectively it comes down to how well the menu is designed that will determine if your menu is easy or difficult to use on different devices. It's said that "beauty lies in simplicity", which is part of the reason why we have brought you 40 brilliant examples of responsive website menus design. The list comprises not only spectacular designs but also illustrations and simple icons as well as tight user interaction. All these factors contribute towards the overall growth of your brand's reputation online which leads to an increase in sales and revenue.

Responsive website navigation menus: The top 40 examples

There are lots of guidelines and standards available for developing a good website navigation system. However, it all boils down to how neatly each HTML code has been coded that determines what type of experience or output you will get. In this article, we have compiled a list of some of the best examples from around the world to help you get ideas and inspiration for your next responsive Website Menu Design project. The following collection will showcase 40 awesome navigation menus which are not only good-looking but also very smart in terms of functionality.

The R eadymag website has a simple layout that is divided into two parts. One part features a slide show while the other half contains a series of articles with images that surround it. They have used small tiles on their home page that feature different articles produced by them allowing users to easily select what they want to read. Having this design element helps users navigate quickly through their home page without losing track of where they were before.

The thumbnails above the fold are quite obvious and well-placed to give readers an idea of what they can expect when clicking each link.

On the home page, they have used a simple menu that always stays at the top right-hand side where users can navigate to any article category with ease. The only drawback is that this type of navigation bar does not work well on smaller devices because it will prevent horizontal scrolling which could damage the user experience. However, on larger devices such as desktop PCs, laptops, and large screen tablets, navigating through their site is very easy and enjoyable even though it's just a responsive layout.

Responsive website menus: Navigation bars that stand out from the crowd

One of the most common methods for building a responsive menu is to stack all links on top of each other and place them horizontally across the screen. This method has been successful because it's easy to use, simple enough for users to find what they are looking for quickly without getting lost. However, there are some drawbacks such as how vertical space is used up by making the entire layout go full-screen which can be annoying if you want to view other parts of your website at the same time.

On their home page, H encoded uses a small icon that takes up minimal horizontal space which can easily fit into any area on the web page. They have also placed their logo above the icon so that users know where this navigation bar comes from.

When hovered over, the icon changes into a blue color and a right arrow appears on each of them. This indicates that if you click on any of the links, it will change the web page accordingly. On smaller screens, users can easily access all four menu items by simply scrolling down their website's home page instead of having to use their fingers to hover over the icon.

The Splashnology website provides an efficient solution for those looking to create responsive menus using simpler but effective techniques. For example, they have chosen to include three navigation links below their logo which appear as large tiled images that are easy to read even though they do not contain text. Users can easily understand what these tiles represent without having much trouble distinguishing one tile from another.

Splashnology has implemented their simple responsive menu as a sticky menu that appears at the top of the home page and only disappears when scrolling down. Their menu bar automatically adjusts according to the available space on smaller devices such as smartphones while still maintaining its core usability on larger screens where it's more convenient for users to read them.

The fact that Splashnology uses large images in three of its navigation links makes it easy for readers to scroll through website content easily without having to use their fingers. It also prevents horizontal scrolling which can be very annoying if you're trying to view other areas of your site's layout simultaneously.

On their website, Park Circa uses a different navigation pattern that is unique compared to what we have seen above. When you look at their menu items, you may not even think it's a navigation bar at first glance because it only contains an image of a map on top of a search box. Instead of using real text for the navigation menu, Park Circa has chosen to include both the address and name of their office which is quite effective in guiding site visitors to where they want them to be.

When hovered over, the menu items transform into active links that can change web pages while maintaining their core simple functionality. It's also important to note that this responsive layout does not use JavaScript coding which means that all devices with an internet browser will be able to access their website easily without any compatibility issues. This is very important especially for those who still prefer purchasing more affordable smartphones and tablets in the future because they will be able to view Park Circa's website without any problems.

Though this method works great with smartphones and other smaller devices, you'll notice that there is a considerable amount of vertical space being wasted on larger screens such as web browser windows. This means that this type of menu cannot fit into every single inch of your layout regardless of how small it may appear on your screen currently is. If you insist on designing a responsive menu based on this example, we suggest that you place it somewhere near the top or bottom areas instead of so that users won't have to worry about scrolling down the page just to access them.

On their website, SeatGeek has placed all their menu items side by side and has transformed them into a single line of text instead of implementing their unique menu style. Just like most responsive layouts, the content on SeatGeek's website adjusts according to its screen size. If you have a smaller device such as a smartphone, this means that you'll only be able to access one link at a time without having to scroll up or down your screen.

This is also true for users who prefer using larger screens with browsers that support full-sized web pages because they will only see two menu items at once which can still be accessed by simply scrolling up and down their homepage right now. What we like about SeatGeek's design is how easy it is for readers to understand what each button despite not having any distinctive borders or shapes.

Interested in learning more about website navigation menu styles? Continue browsing Splashnology, Park Circa, and SeatGeek's websites to get even more inspiring design ideas. Feel free to visit our blog for more articles like this one!

Steps To Reproduce (for web developers) Viewing the demo page of this prototype will allow you to experience what it feels like when using responsive layouts with inconsistent amounts of content on each screen size. This allows you to get a better understanding of what your site visitors will be experiencing if you decide to use this type of layout. If needed, feel free to adjust your browser's window resolution or zoom level until it matches ours exactly so that you can see the extent of its behavior. For more information on how to use this prototype, scroll down the page until you see the "Use This Design?" section.

What can you say about this design? How does it make you feel when reading website content that has different amounts of text appearing on each screen size? Please share your thoughts by leaving a comment below! We'd love to hear what you think of Splashnology's expandable responsive menu styles or Park Circa's navigation bar with search box and image map. If you have any questions regarding our prototypes, don't hesitate to ask us via our Contact Form.

Also, please don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter for updates about new posts and other awesome resources that we come across while surfing around the web. Last but not least, if you own a website or blog and would like to share this article with your readers, please feel free to do so using the provided code sample below!

Your main HTML menu tools: links, anchors, and lists

To create a simple, plain HTML structure menu structure for your website—which is the most common use of list tags—you must use all three list items. You may have noticed that the sample page uses two unordered lists and one ordered list, marked with ul, ol, and li tags respectively.

Each list element has its function:

An unordered list creates a bulleted list. For this example, we've given it a black bullet using an image rather than text decoration. Keep in mind that lists without bullets look much cleaner especially on larger screens such as those found on tablets or laptops.

An ordered (or numbered) list creates a numbered (or chronological) list such as the ones used to indicate steps or other numerical order. Again, we've given it a numbered bullet to help the visitor identify each menu item better.

To style your menu even further use CSS styles rules. We'll show you an example of how to do so below:

</head> <body> <!-- Use this design? -->

Use This Design? Of course, you can! You are very welcome to use Splashnology's Expandable Responsive Navigation Menu using the following code snippet provided by our developers! All you have to do is copy and paste the HTML source code found at the end of this page into your own website's <body></body> tags or feel free to adjust its properties until it matches your needs. However, please make sure that you credit Splashnology as the author and also provide a link back to this page if you decide to publish it online.

</body></html>

Like all pure CSS layouts , there is no specific code needed if you plan to use responsive web design with your HTML menu: simply create a container ( .nav ) and make sure that you place all of its children ( ul , ol and li elements) inside it. For more information on how to properly style lists using CSS, take a look at our blog post "Drop-Down Navigation Menus With CSS3". Preview Download Source Code The Menu's Basic Structure: <div class="nav"> <ul> <li><a href="#">Home</a></li> <li><a href="#">Products</a></li> <li><a href="#">Projects</a></li> <li><a href="#">Team</a></li> </ul> </div>

The two unordered lists are used for the navigation section's structure. The ordered list is necessary in order to create an interactive drop-down menu li that reveals hyperlinks when its parent element ( li ) receives focus. To style this menu, we've used CSS rules found at the bottom of our sample CSS file : .nav { position: relative; clear: both; background-color: #fff; height: 0; overflow: hidden; } .nav ul { padding: 0; margin: 0; list-style: none; border: 0; } .nav ul li { position: relative; display: inline-block; float: left; margin-right: 5px; text-align: center; width: 14%; padding-top: 0.5em !important; /* This is how we give this style a value in order to avoid conflicts when users add their own rules */ font-family: 1.2em !important; background-color:#333 !important; color:#fff !important;} .nav > ul > li.hover { background-color:#f0f0f0 !important;} .nav > ul li a { cursor: pointer; text-decoration: none; color:#333 !important;}

Note that the style rules indicate that we've also changed the menu's background color and text color. This is to help visitors understand that this element is currently active (i.e., its parent container has focus). We've also given this style a font-size value to make sure it looks like an important button: if we don't do so, some mobile devices will consider li elements as low-level menus and thus show them with very small font sizes! Also note how we use em values for text formatting, as indicated in the code sample above.

Fancy borders without images The left inset border created using border-left-style: inset looks great at first sight but it requires the use of images for each one of your menu's links. In some cases, this is not an issue, but if your HTML menu's links use more than three colors you'll end up having a different image for each border.

The code above uses a clever CSS trick to avoid the reset of font styles and other properties on hyperlinks: the rule applies to all anchor tags but its value can be overwritten by a specific rule for links that have keyboard focus. This way we only need one image (refer to Splashnology's logo) for this design instead of four!

Please note that using em units ensures that this style will work with any possible text formatting changes done by future visitors who might apply their own custom rules either directly or through a plugin such as Style Manager from Automattic (the company behind WordPress).

There are many ways to design a navigation menu, but the most important thing is that you come up with something that makes it easy for visitors to navigate your website. Be sure to take care of both visual clarity and accessibility too! If you have any questions on this topic just leave us a comment.

What are website menus?

Menus in web design refer to a graphical representation of clickable links. These links usually point to the main content of a website and they help visitors find what they're looking for more quickly.

Using AJAX with Web Forms A lot of times we want to add extra interactivity to our websites. We do this by implementing JavaScript code that adds features such as drag-and-drop, modal windows, and live content previews. This is great but sometimes we need something even simpler: often all we want is for some content on our site to change when we press a button or when we select an item from a dropdown menu (for example). This can be achieved using AJAX - which you can learn more about here. In this tutorial, we'll show you how to use AJAX with a simple web form that lets visitors pick an item from a list of colors and then changes the background color of the website's content area after they select a specific option.

To achieve this using AJAX we can do something like this: function changeBackground() { var response = new XMLHttpRequest(); response.onreadystatechange = function() { if (this.readyState == 4 && this.status == 200) { document.getElementById('bg').style.backgroundColor = this.responseText; } }; //The AJAX request goes here... } window.onload=function(){ setInterval(changeBackground,10000); };

HTML5 Drag and Drop Tutorial HTML5 Drag &amp; amp; amp; Drop is a great feature that has just made its way into the W3C standards. If you're wondering what it does, here's the gist of it: the user can "drag" an element into another container or even outside of any container. Then he/she can drop that element into either another container or position on the page (as long as there's no placeholder). It sounds simple, but I'll show you how to do this in this tutorial.

Knowing what you want is the first step, but quite often you just need some inspiration to get started. This should be easier if you have a list of things that are working well for other sites in your industry - but unfortunately most articles about design showcase many different styles and approaches.

So here's my solution: I decided to create this collection of navigation menus that have caught my attention over the past few years. Some of them are extremely creative while others are more traditional but they all have one thing in common: they work!

HTML 4 Menus Tutorials The HTML 4 specification defines three types of menu, two of which are relevant to us at the moment. An unordered list (i.e., an <ul> element) is used to build an unordered list menu whereas a list item (i.e., <li>) element is used for each of the items in such a menu:

JavaScript Menus Tutorials JavaScript menus are those that contain clickable elements inside other HTML documents that perform different actions when you either mouse over or click them. There's no limit as to what these actions can be and they could even change other parts of your website (for example). This tutorial covers all you need to know about creating pop-up menus with JavaScript, including how to make them open in front or stay within the same parent window.

CSS3 Navigation Menus Tutorials CSS3 provides rounded corners, gradients, and shadows which give websites a more professional look. Menus are one of the places where these new features can stand out, which is why they work so well together.

CSS3 Drop-Down Navigation Menu Tutorial This tutorial will show you how to create a CSS3 drop-down menu using only HTML, no JavaScript coding is needed. We'll make use of some simple CSS properties along with pseudo-elements to create this eye-catching effect that works great on modern devices including mobiles. There are many ways of implementing them but I'm going to show you how to do it without any images or Flash animation.

HTML Dropdown Menu Tutorial If you're looking for an easy way to spice up your site's navigation then take a look at this tutorial which shows you how to implement dropdown menus using only HTML and CSS. In this example, I've created a stylish default menu containing four items with a hover effect that reveals the sub-menu when moused over each item.

HTML Submenus Tutorials Sub menus are a great way of adding some additional information to a page without cluttering up your navigation too much or sacrificing precious screen space on devices such as tablets. This tutorial shows you how to create them in both HTML and CSS, explaining some of the key differences between the two methods along the way.

CSS3 Submenu Tutorial Since every website has multiple pages, it is necessary to have a way of navigating from one page to another so users can see content from different sites. This tutorial covers how to add dropdown sub-menus to your navigation using only CSS3.

CSS Dropdown Menu Tutorial The drop-down menu has always been a popular choice for websites that want to incorporate a simple way of moving between subpages. This tutorial focuses on how to implement them in CSS, which you can then adapt for use with JavaScript or jQuery depending on your requirements.

JavaScript Tree Menu Tutorials One of the easiest ways to create menus inside your site's pages is by adding JavaScript Tree Menus. This type of menu makes it easy for users to navigate around your site without having to scroll back up and also allows them to quickly find what they're looking for since all the links are shown in one place.

CSS 3 Animated Navigation Bar Tutorial As more designers begin to embrace the power of CSS3, we're seeing a huge number of stunning effects popping up all over the web. In this tutorial, I will show you how to create a simple animated navigation menu using only pure HTML and CSS3. The concept is pretty simple; when the user hovers over an element it gently enlarges and moves slightly to reveal another underneath.

HTML Navigation Bar Tutorials One method of creating website navigation is by making use of dropdown menus like those seen on social networking sites or Google Reader. These are nice for users since they allow them to quickly scan through your different categories without having to look at anything else on the page with most browsers displaying them down by default.

CSS Drop Down Menus Tutorials Another way of creating easy-to-read and user-friendly navigation is by using CSS Dropdown menus. These allow you to expand a single menu element into a sub-menu containing several additional links that users can simply click on to move between different pages or sections within your site.

CSS Advanced Menu Tutorials This tutorial shows how to create an advanced drop-down menu that only displays the main nav bar when the page first loads then hide it away until the user scrolls down. The idea behind this technique is that it allows you, as the designer, to present visitors with more information at a glance without making them work for it by having to scroll through a sea of content before they find what they want.

JavaScript Vertical Navigation Bar Tutorial Menus are an essential part of most web pages, but they can be made easier to use by making them vertical instead of horizontal. This allows users to easily browse through categories without having to go back and forth across the page or down large amounts of content.

Adsense Vertical Menu Tutorial The last method I'll show you uses JavaScript and CSS to create a completely free menu bar that doesn't have any gaps between each element due to images or other design elements being used for spacing purposes. It's great if you want something that looks professional without spending money on custom-made menus since it will work just fine with any layout.

CSS3 Drop-Downs With One Flexible Image A couple of weeks ago I published an article about dropdown menus using pure HTML and CSS. It aimed to show that you didn't need images or JavaScript to create beautiful-looking menus like those used on most eCommerce sites. However, since it uses only style sheets, none of the sub-menus will pull back if they're offscreen, making them useless for mobile devices which can have a difficult time reaching everything with just one click. This tutorial shows how you can fix this problem by using a single image that stretches to fit the width of your layout so all your sub-menus are always available.

CSS 3 Animated Sliding Content Menus One of the main advantages of using animated content sliders is that they grab visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though, like before, is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

CSS3 Anamorphic Navigation Menu - Flexible Navigation Bar This next idea uses pure CSS to create a flexible menu bar that can adapt to different screen sizes automatically without any need for media queries or JavaScript hacks. The only drawback is that you'll need an image editor which can make images with transparent parts for this menu bar to look good on your site (or at least know how to crop images yourself).

CSS Animated Content Sliding Menu One of the big advantages of using animated menus is that they grab visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though, like before, is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

Pure CSS Resizable Vertical Menu If you're sick and tired of having to resize the text on menus every time you use a new font or update your layout then all the methods I've shown you so far will probably seem rather pointless. This tutorial aims to change all that by showing how you can build a vertically resizable menu using only style sheets and pure HTML. Not only does this allow users to simply click on any available space without having to put up with constantly re-sizing their browser window, but each element can be resized independently to fit any layout.

CSS Animated Dropdown Menu - Vertical Navigation Bar One of the biggest advantages of animation is that it grabs visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects, giving your content a sense that it's somehow "special". The downside to this method though is that it can impractical for mobile users since every item has to be fully loaded before scrolling down them all becomes possible.

JavaScript Horizontal Resizable Menu If you're sick and tired of watching text shrink every time you change the font or update your layout, then all the methods I've shown you so far might seem rather pointless. This tutorial aims to change all that by showing how you can build a horizontally resizable menu using only JavaScript. Not only does this allow users to simply click on any available space without having to resize their browser window, but each element can be resized independently to fit any layout.

Pure CSS Windowshade Menu One of the big advantages of animated menus is that they grab visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users since every item has to be fully loaded before scrolling down them all becomes possible.

CSS3 Scrolling Navigation Bar This tutorial shows how you can make simple yet beautiful looking vertical scrolling navigation menus using only style sheets and pure HTML. Each element can be resized independently to fit any layout. Pure CSS Animated Dropdown Menu - Horizontal Navigation Bar One of the biggest advantages of animation is that it grabs visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though, like before, is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

HTML5 Video

Background Menu This tutorial shows how you can make rather fancy-looking vertical scrolling navigation menus using only style sheets and pure HTML. Each element can be resized independently to fit any layout.

Pure CSS Page Curl Effect One of the big advantages of using animated menus is that they grab visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

CSS Vertical Resizable Content Sliding Menu If you're sick and tired of watching text shrink every time you change the font or update your layout, then all the methods I've shown you so far might seem rather pointless. This tutorial aims to change all that by showing how you can build a vertically resizable content sliding menu using only CSS3.

Pure CSS Horizontal Resizable Menu One of the biggest advantages of using animated menus is that they grab visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

HTML5 Video Background Menus - Vertical Navigation Bar This tutorial shows how you can make rather fancy-looking vertical scrolling navigation menus using only style sheets and pure HTML. Each element can be resized independently to fit any layout Pure CSS Scrolling Dropdown Menu One of the biggest advantages of using animation is that it grabs visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though, like before, is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

Pure CSS Windowshade Navigation Menu One of the big advantages of animated menus is that they grab visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users since every item has to be fully loaded before scrolling down them all becomes possible.

Pure CSS Horizontal Windowshade Menu  One of the biggest advantages of animation is that it grabs visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though, like before, is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

CSS Scrolling Vertical Navigation Bar One of the biggest advantages of using animated menus is that they grab visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though, like before, is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

Pure CSS Windowshade Navigation Menu One of the big advantages of animated menus is that they grab visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though, like before, is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users since every item has to be fully loaded before scrolling down them all becomes possible.

Pure CSS Vertical Resizable Menus - Scrolling Dropdown Menu This tutorial shows how you can make rather fancy-looking vertically scrolling navigation menus using only style sheets and pure HTML. Each element can be resized independently to fit any layout. Pure CSS Scrolling Windowshade Menu One of the biggest advantages of using animation is that it grabs visitors' attention more quickly than static navigation bars. They also look particularly nice when combined with other sliding effects since they give the impression that your content is somehow "special". The downside to this method though, like before, is that it can be rather impractical for mobile users.

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