Svg XSS Attempt

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Intersite Script attacks on computers have become popular targets in recent years in all parts of the world. This attack targets people who use a computer website rather than a server. The commoner approach uses data input from users seen by others, like commenting on videos that don't clean the input correctly. It's more likely to embed and disallow inline Javascript into SVG images. To counteract the threat, you should completely block images or attachments on the site. In addition, it is advisable that these photos must not be rendered for some people.

The attackers will use the client-side attack to trick victims into running malicious SVG files.

A victim can be tricked into running a malicious script in any browser that renders images, such as Internet Explorer, Mozilla, Safari, and Google Chrome. For example, a user could click on a link or open an email attachment and release the embedded image tags to trigger the javascript code. When this is done, it can cause an XSS attack by writing scripts on its page and tricking users into clicking on them.

It's possible for people who want to prevent these types of attacks before running the intended HTML code by setting up additional filters that block certain MIME types or SVG extension ways from being read by web browsers. These Web Application Firewalls may filter out the malicious code and help to prevent the attack. But, of course, WAF must always be up-to-date with the latest evasion techniques attackers use.

WAF can also help identify malicious files and stop them from being executed, which will help protect your site from any potential damage. In addition, by correctly configuring your WAF, you can add an extra layer of security that can help protect your website from cross-site scripting attacks.

If you want to protect your website from cross-site scripting attacks

Cross-site scripting attacks are a severe threat to any company that uses the internet. The most common way they're carried out is by embedding Javascript into SVG images, which can then be used to steal information or redirect users. This attack targets people who use a computer website rather than the server itself. It's more likely to embed Javascript into SVG images because these files are often not scanned for malicious code before being uploaded and displayed on websites. That means it's up to you as an administrator of your site – whether it's WordPress or Drupal –to make sure this doesn't happen on your site!

Geolance is here for you, protecting against all types of cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks with our XSS Prevention Module! Our service scans every file upload SVG files and comment submission for malicious code using industry-leading technology so we can stop hackers in their tracks! We also offer 24/7 support via phone and email if anything goes wrong during the installation or usage of our product. So if you're ready now, click "Get Started" below and sign up today! You'll be protected in no time at all!

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SVG = XSS

SVG enables script injection through text and attribute values by including External Objects

Suppose an attacker manages to inject "external object" content into an SVG document. In that case, they may extract information about our server software, its version number, or even extract the usernames of people who use the website.

This can be prevented by:

- Filtering out all external objects within your application before rendering / parsing them.

- Whitelisting only trusted sources for SVG files (make sure you don't get malicious SVG file sources)

- Applying input filters to user input data before it is used in the rendering process.

- Using a web application firewall (WAF) to detect and block malicious SVG content.

A Web Application Firewall (WAF) is an important part of your defensive arsenal against cross-site scripting attacks. A WAF is a special type of security appliance or software that is deployed in front of web applications and detects and blocks malicious content, such as exploits, SQL injection attempts, and cross-site scripting attacks.

Many WAFs also offer protection against other web-based attacks, such as Denial of Service (DoS) and Man-in-the-Middle (MitM) attacks.

If you are using a WAF, make sure that it is configured to detect and block malicious SVG content.

Cross-site scripting attacks using SVG images have become a popular target in recent years. This attack targets people who use a computer website rather than the server itself. The commoner approach is to use data input from users seen by others, like commenting on videos that don't clean the input correctly. Unfortunately, it's more likely to embed non-malicious Javascript into SVG images. To counteract the threat, you should completely block images or attachments on the site.

When SVG enables script injection through text and attribute values by including External Objects:

Note: This is not a vulnerability in itself, but the result could be the same as cross-site scripting. If you're using, rendering, or parsing SVG files that are received from outside sources without knowing it you can still have XSS issues. To avoid this issue several steps should be taken:

- Filter out all external objects within your application before rendering / parsing them.

- Whitelist only trusted sources for SVG files to avoid an attacker injecting harmful code into your site due to insufficient input validation.

- Apply input filters to user input data before it's used in the rendering process.

- Use a web application firewall (WAF) to detect and block malicious SVG content.

Graphics or document

External content or objects can be defined as:

Graphics embedded in a document using the <img> tag.

- Document fragments that are inserted into a document using the DOM.

- External resources that are loaded into a document using the src attribute of the <object>, <embed>, or <frame> tags.

When you include SVG files on your website, make sure you only use trusted sources. You can do this by whitelisting the source URLs for SVG files or using a web application firewall (WAF) to detect and block malicious SVG content.

SVG on the Web

SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) is a graphics format that enables you to create vector graphics files that can be scaled to any size without losing quality. SVG files are created using a text editor or a specialized SVG editor, and they can be used on websites and in printed documents. In addition, all major web browsers support SVG files, and they can be used to create interactive animations and user interfaces.

In addition, SVG files can be used to create complex graphics, such as illustrations, logos, and icons.

The main advantage of SVG is that it enables you to create vector graphics that can be scaled to any size without losing quality. In addition, SVG files support transparency and filters, which enable you to create sophisticated graphics effects.

All major web browsers support SVG files, and they can be used to create interactive animations and user interfaces.

In addition, SVG files can be used to create complex graphics, such as illustrations, logos, and icons.

The main advantage of SVG is that it enables you to create vector graphics that can be scaled to any size without losing quality. In addition, SVG files support transparency and filters, which enable you to create sophisticated graphics effects.

Conclusion

SVG is a graphics format that enables you to create vector graphics files that can be scaled to any size without losing quality. All major modern browsers support SVG files, and they can be used to create interactive animations and user interfaces.

However, when you include SVG files on your website, make sure you only use trusted sources. You can do this by whitelisting the source URLs for SVG files or using a web application firewall (WAF) to detect and block malicious SVG content disposition.

Solution

When you include SVG files on your website, make sure you only use trusted sources. You can do this by whitelisting the source URLs for SVG files or using a web application firewall (WAF) to detect and block malicious SVG content.

You can also use a WAF to protect your website from other types of attacks, such as SQL injection attempts and cross-site scripting attacks. Ensure the WAF you are using is configured to detect and block malicious SVG content.

Introduction

Web Application Firewall (WAF) is a security tool that sits in front of web applications and detects and blocks malicious content, such as exploits, SQL injection attempts, and cross-site scripting attacks. Many WAFs also offer protection against other web-based attacks, such as Denial of Service (DoS) and Man-in-the-Middle (MitM) attacks.

Waf can be integrated into existing applications through the use of CGI scripts or in some cases the waf application itself can be opted to run behind an existing HTTP server using an HTTP proxy.

SVG in the Wild

SVG is popular with attackers because it enables them to embed malicious content that can bypass WAFs because it is a vector image

<svg onload="alert('XSS')"> <img src="http://victim.com/logo.png" /> </svg>

As seen in the video, an XSS payload attempt was discovered on a website that did not allow for javascript to run but did allow for svg content security policy to be embedded into webpages elements functionality.

The malicious code is hidden within SVG file types which are combined with a standard HTML IMG tag by the attacker resulting in the XSS being executed when loaded on the victim page. As a result, the body tag and all its child tags are interpreted by the user agent as belonging to XHTML.

An example of this scenario looks like below - note how it evades current tools e.g WAFs and HIPS systems since it runs without scripts etc... As mentioned above, WAFs can be configured to specifically block SVG content-type header and this is the best way to protect yourself against potential attacks.

The latest research

We are seeing many of these types of attacks hitting client-side applications.

"Web Application Firewalls are supposed to stop this type of exploit but most current WAFs don't support blocking SVG files, so they tend to get through."

Final thoughts... As always, make sure you test your websites frequently using enterprise-class scanners which can detect web application stored XSS vulnerabilities in both static and dynamic scans. Regularly check for security updates for your applications and operating system, and use a WAF to protect your web applications from malicious content.

SVG is a graphics format that enables you to create vector graphics files that can be scaled to any size without losing quality. All major web browsers support SVG files, and they can be used to create interactive animations and user interfaces.

However, when you include SVG files on your website, make sure you only use trusted sources. You can do this by whitelisting the source URLs for SVG files or using a web application firewall (WAF) to detect and block malicious SVG content.

You can also use a WAF to protect your website from other types of, such as SQL injection attempts and cross-site scripting attacks. Make sure the WAF you are using is configured to detect and block malicious SVG image content.

XML Entity Processing – Billion Laughs Attack

It's 2015 and time to catch up on the last few entries I've missed. Here's one where the name of the vulnerability is pretty descriptive, which doesn't happen often. It has been assigned CVE-2015-0250, so go ahead and use that in your queries if you need to track it down further.

The official description is: The (1) xmlParserEntityCheck and (2) xmlParseAttValueComplex functions in parser.c in libxml2 2.9.1 do not properly keep track of the recursion depth, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (stack consumption and application crash) a crafted XML document containing a large number of nested entity references.

Interesting. A stack consumption vulnerability in libxml2 is the XML parser used by pretty much every primary web application I know of, including PHP. But maybe that isn't surprising if you look at how it works.

As described in the documentation, an XML entity contains text declared unparsed character data or markup declarations. Parsed entities contain an XML-id value, a doctype SVG public identifier, a system identifier, and/or a notation name. Unparsed entities contain only an XML-id value that identifies them as unparsed until they are parsed (e.g., by a parser invoked when the entity is referenced from another document). Parsed entities may also contain a notation name (unparsed entities cannot).

Unsafe to use recursion when parsing anything, but in the case of XML, it is usually represented by entity references. Also, something that looks like an entity reference can be used for markup declarations, which are allowed to have the same name as entities provided they aren't parsed.

So how would you exploit this? The easiest way would probably be using a Billion Laughs attack, which consists of nesting multiple references to the same entity inside itself. It doesn't matter if these are real entity references or not, so long as they are deep enough to hit the recursion limit in xmlParseAttValueComplex.

There's also some information on this type of issue over at OWASP.

Summary of affected versions: It looks like it's a libxml2 bug since this is the 2.9.1 version, but it's not too surprising that WordPress hasn't updated to anything newer yet given how slow its release cycle usually is.

The vulnerability exists in libxml >= 2.7.3 and <= 2.9.1, so any website still on something older than that should upgrade ASAP, especially if it uses some XML parser on the backend! And, all web applications using XML parsers, whether they are standalone or built into another library, are also vulnerable until they provide an update for this issue.

What about WordPress? WordPress provides two XML parsers: one for RSS feeds ( xml2rfc.php ) and one for importing posts from XML files ( XML-parse.php ). The first one is not vulnerable, but the second one is.

So, if you are using WordPress and haven't upgraded to at least 2.9.1 yet, go ahead and do that now! And if you are using a plugin that uses the XML-parse.php parser, make sure it has been updated to address this issue.

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